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Allergy and Asthma Care of Brooklyn

A blog written by Dr. Cascya Charlot and the staff at Allergy and Asthma Care of Brooklyn, New York.

Allergies Without Insurance a Financial Burden

By RADHA CHITALE
ABC News Medical Unit

Compared to other chronic conditions like heart disease or diabetes, treating allergies may be relatively inexpensive. But for those without health insurance, personal circumstances and medical costs can quickly add up to a price that is simply out of reach.

And as more allergy medicines transitioned to over-the-counter status beginning in 2001, even some allergy sufferers with health insurance began having trouble affording their treatments.

In these situations, the only choice left for someone with allergies may be to soldier on, miserable, before ending up in the ER.

Quantifying the cost of having an allergy is difficult because of the range of types and severities.

For example, allergic rhinitis, or hay fever, could require two or three visits to a doctor each year plus a supply of over-the-counter antihistamine medication, which can cost about $1,000 yearly, according to a report from the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.

"It's doable, but it's not free," said Dr. Jonathan Bernstein, a professor of medicine in the University of Cincinnati's Division of Immunology and Allergy. "It depends on proper diagnosis and proper treatment, but the cost to manage a patient with seasonal allergic rhinitis is not that expensive."

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4 Types of Allergy Medications: Which Is Right for You?

By Jessica Ryen Doyle  - FoxNews.com

Sneezing. Itchy, watery eyes. Nasal congestion. Sinus pressure.

It may sound like the worst cold ever, but if you are one of the millions of Americans living with allergies, you know these symptoms can last for weeks, months or even year-round.

Sure, there are simple tasks a person can do to lessen their allergic symptoms. For example, washing your hair before you go to bed to rinse the allergens out of it may be helpful. Severe allergy sufferers are sure to keep their house super-clean, not a speck of dust in sight.

However, the only real way to prevent or stop an allergy attack, is by taking medicine, Dr. Cascya Charlot of The Allergy and Asthma Care of Brooklyn, N.Y., told FOXNews.com.

But with all the medicines advertised on television and in magazines, how do you know which one does what?

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  • Allergy and Asthma Care of Brooklyn
  •  10 Plaza Street # 1E
    Brooklyn, NY 11238
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